P. agnata

Oliver Gluch's
World of Carnivorous Plants
or:

"What you always wanted to know about butterworts"

Impressum

P. filifolia
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Pinguicula grandiflora ssp. rosea (Mutel) Casper (1962)






The French botanist Pierre Auguste Victor Mutel described already in 1830 a population from the French Savoyen Alps that grew along the Grand Canal near Grenoble, which differed in the flower form and flower coloration from the typical P. grandiflora. In 1962 the German botanist S. Jost Casper ranked these populations, that were found in the meantime at other locations with the same stable characters, as a subspecies under the denomination ssp. rosea.


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Plants grow either directly on wet, vertical limestone cliffs or in wet meadows along small streams. This subspecies of P. grandiflora was found only in the two French departments Haute-Savoie and Isère in altitudes between 650 and 1400 m above sea level.


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This subspecies differs from ssp. grandiflora by its smaller flower, by its white to pale rose-pink coloration of the corolla lobes, by the rose-pink tube covered with a reddish veination, by the straight and awl-shaped spur (mainly of a dark red or red-violet colour) and by the short, oval-shaped lobes of the upper calyx lip.


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If the following principles are respected a successful cultivation of P. grandiflora ssp. rosea in a cold greenhouse or outside is possible. As with all temperate butterwort species you should keep the substrate wet all year round, with a reduced watering during the period when the plants have formed the hibernaculum, otherwise there is a risk that the plants would rot. To overwinter plants in a cold greenhouse temperatures between 0 and 5° C are recommended. Higher temperatures up to 10° C will be tolerated by the plants, but there is a higher risk that fungi would develop on the plants and may harm them and plants will probably form summer leaves very early in the year. To overwinter the winter buds in a fridge is also an option, but then I would recommend treating the hibernaculum with a fungicide against mould. If plants are cultivated outside, a permanent freezing and thawing of the substrate should be prevented, as then the hibernaculum could move outside of the substrate and would then dry out. Cultivation in pure peat is possible. Good cultivation results can be achieved also by using pure vermiculite. The latter has the advantage that even under wet conditons the substrate still has enough larger pores to secure a good aeration of the roots.